Every Piece From Palace’s Summer 2018 Collection

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After unveiling the collection with a Juergen Teller-shot lookbook earlier this week, London’s Palace has revealed all of the pieces from its Summer 2018 collection. This season’s collection features new GORE-TEX pieces, as well as a collaboration with Californian performance label Oakley.

Key pieces in the collection include the thermo nuclear track jackets, shorts and hats made with Oakley, the camouflager “Moorish” jacket and pants, as well as lightweight outerwear items. Other stand-out items include Palace underwear, special edition Oakley sunglasses and a bright-orange luggage capsule.

In terms of graphics prints, the Summer 2018 collection includes a new Panda graphic, an all-over wave print and a bones version of the classic Triferg logo. Take a look through all of the pieces from the drop in the gallery above. The first pieces from the collection are set to launch via Palace’s web store, London and New York locations, as well as the newly-launched Japan online store, at 11AM local time on May 4.

Oakley’s latest cycling replica sunglasses promise to cut down on the fog

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When a cyclist works up a sweat during a long climb or fast sprint, it is not uncommon for the heat and perspiration to get trapped behind their lens, causing them to fog over. This can lead to impaired vision, which is especially troubling when you’re screaming down the opposite side of the hill at 30-plus mph and can’t see the road in front of you. But with its latest line of cycling-focused eyewear Oakley has addressed this concern by creating a unique venting system designed to eliminate the fog altogether, helping riders to see more clearly at all times.

With just one look, it is easy to see that a lot of thought has gone into the design of the new cheap Oakley Flight Jacket and Field Jacket sunglasses. For starters, both are equipped with the company’s Prizm lens, which have been fine-tuned to offer the best possible clarity and contrast while riding. Oakley’s engineers have achieved this by fine-tuning the way individual waves of light pass through the lenses, which in turn allows cyclists to see more details of the world around them. This makes it much easier to identify obstacles in the road or pick a safer line to ride for instance.

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Oakley has also developed what it believes is a new breakthrough in airflow technology that it calls “The Advancer.” Located in the bridge of the nose on the replica sunglasses, The Advancer gives riders the ability to improve ventilation at the touch of a toggle switch. When the switch is moved into place it not only opens a small vent in the nose of the glasses, it also causes the nose piece to slide slightly away from the frame. This has the added effect of moving the sunglasses ever so slightly away from the face, creating more airflow in the process. This should, in theory, help to keep fog from developing on the inside of the lenses.

The Flight Jacket and Field Jacket have also been designed to be extremely aerodynamic, while also offering 100 percent UV protection, too. The two models differ in some important ways, however, including the fact that the Flight Jacket features an open-edged brow for an improved field of view. That model also comes with interchangeable temple lengths to improve compatibility with a wide variety of bike helmets. Meanwhile, the Field Jacket is a dual-lens model with a more traditional-looking frame that has been built to accommodate prescription lenses.

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Both the Flight Jacket and Field Jacket are available now on Oakley’s website.

What’s The Story With Those Ski & Snowboard Goggles That Are All Over The Olympics?

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Chloe Kim, in her Oakley goggles, celebrating her gold medal after the Women’s Snowboard Halfpipe final event in the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

Most Olympic athletes from around the world have a favorite – or sponsored – brand for clothing and equipment. But if you’ve been watching the skiing and snowboarding events, it seems as though a certain very distinctive pair of goggles – half orange, half yellow – has been showing up on just about everyone. The snow goggles and replica sunglasses are a great example of product placement, and are part of Oakley’s new, limited edition Harmony Fade collection.

Oakley was founded in a California garage in 1975 by now-billionaire Jim Jannard, and the company was named after his English setter, Oakley Anne. It went public in 1995 and was sold to multi-brand Italian optical giant Luxottica in 2007. One of the leading product design and sport performance brands in the world, Oakley now has clothing lines and other gear, but is still best known for its lens technologies, on which it holds more than 800 patents.

The Harmony Fade collection was “developed to celebrate the journey and commitment that athletes make to reach the world stage of competition, Harmony Fade honors the path of greatness, while inspiring athletes of all levels to chase the journey of possibility,” according to company literature. The orange and yellow incorporated throughout the Harmony Fade collection of goggles and sunglasses are inspired by the colors on Oakley’s Prizm lenses. Orange represents “the fire that burns inside each and every competitor” while yellow is “for the sun that lights the path of athletes brave enough to pursue their dreams.” The Harmony Fade collection is made up of seven types of goggles and five styles of cheap sunglasses for a variety of sports.

The Prizm lens technology is found in Oakley’s snow, sport and everyday lines. In the snow line, the technology claims to dramatically enhance contrast and visibility over a wide range of light conditions, and was engineered to offer this versatility and reduce the need to switch lenses as lighting conditions change. If you watched the Men’s Halfpipe final, you saw how half of the pipe was in sun and the other in shade, a perfect example of the conditions athletes need to adjust to.

Team USA snowboarder and crowd favorite Chloe Kim was wearing her Harmony Fade goggles when she won a gold medal – by a huge margin – in the Ladies’ Halfpipe this week. Now 17, she was unable to compete in the 2014 Olympic games in Sochi because the rules deemed her too young, even though she was likely good enough. At the 2016 US Grand Prix in Park City, UT, she became the first women snowboarder ever to land back-to-back 1080s in competition. That same run scored a 100, and she remains the only female snowboarder to achieve this perfect score – though she came quite close in her winning Olympic run.

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Mikaela Shiffrin competing in the Women’s Slalom at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

Another high-profile woman Oakley athlete sporting the ubiquitous goggles is U.S. alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin, who at age 18 became the youngest alpine skier, male or female, to win gold in the slalom at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi. Shiffrin failed to defend her title this week, coming in fourth, but did get another gold in giant slalom.

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Staale Sandbech of Norway competes during the Men’s Slopestyle qualification on day one of the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

It’s not just Americans – the goggles are everywhere. Norwegian snowboarder and Oakley athlete Staale Sandbech wore them when he competed in the Men’s Slopestyle, coming in fourth place, and will also wear a pair for the Men’s Big Air next week. Though he’s now 24, he too found athletic accomplishment at an early age; in 2010, at age 16, he became the youngest male Norwegian athlete to compete in the winter Olympics.

I recently wrote about the big splash that the fringed, Western-style leather gloves worn by Team USA in the Opening Ceremonies made, lighting up social media during the festivities. The Harmony Fade has picked up the mantle, and will likely be a mainstay on the slopes long after the 2018 Winter Olympic Games have come and gone.

Cheap Oakley windjacket 2.0 sunglasses review

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Oakley’s Wind Jacket 2.0 sunnies are not for the faint of heart; they are big and bright, but are a solid set of cycling shades.

They are technically positioned in the brand’s lineup as a ‘goggle’, and with the massive coverage, removable triple layer face foam and even an optional strap, this description is apt, but I’d still classify them as replica sunglasses.

From the top of the frame to the bottom it measures 80mm, that’s nearly double the 53mm of the Jawbreaker and similarly-sized POC DO Blade. This additional size did cause the top of the frame to bump on some lower slung helmets, such as the Scott Centric Plus, POC Octal and the new Bontrager Velocis, however there was no such issue with the Met Strale.

That said, with such a large lens the frame sits well outside your field of view, even in full aero TT position.

At their widest point, the Wind Jacket 2.0s measure 150mm, with the lower section of the lens slightly scalloped to make a bit of room for your cheekbones.

The ‘Unobtanium’ nosepiece isn’t adjustable on the Wind Jacket 2.0 and it’s strung quite wide too. For the record, I have a pretty big schnoz, and the wide nosepiece perched the sunnies in just the right spot on my face, those with noses closer to the button variety might not find the same fit.

In rare form for Oakley replica, the ear stocks aren’t rubberised, and are quite short. Tested with every lid I had lying around the office, the arms don’t do not interfere with the retention system and despite the lack of tacky coating stayed planted on my face through extremely rocky sections of singletrack and washboard dirt roads.

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The nosepiece isn’t adjustable and is wide set too

As the Wind Jacket 2.0s are classified as a google they come with a removable strip of triple density face foam, which plugs into the vents at the top of the lens. The idea of this being to prevent debris, sweat and some wind from sneaking over the top of the frame and into your eyes. I found it was hot and quickly became saturated with sweat, as with helmet pads, and I quickly removed it.

I didn’t have any trouble with fogging, in a wide range of temperatures. With decent sized vents at the top of the lens and small channels in the bottom corners, in combination with the lens actually sitting quite far off your face, there is plenty of airflow to the lens that combats moisture.

The coverage is second to only a google and I would argue that the Wind Jacket 2.0s offer a similar amount of protection without many of the negatives that come with riding in goggles.

These sunnies really shined in the rain with the massive lens creating a veritable shield against moisture falling from the sky, but also the water, mud and grit that gets kicked up off the ground by other riders.

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The lens is massive and provides plenty of coverage, but it also does bump the brow of some lids

In the past couple of years, Oakley has decided to only apply its hydrophobic coating to the outside of its lenses, but we’d really like to see it on the inside too. No matter how hard you try, there are always sweat smears on the inside of the lens.

For the moment, the Wind Jacket 2.0 is only available with cheap Oakley’s Prizm Snow lens, however I was very impressed by how it performed on the road and trail. Designed to prevent snow blindness and eyestrain in the bright sun, while at the same time adding contrast to the white abyss of a flat light day on the snow, this translated extremely well to riding environments.

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For the moment it’s only available in the Snow Prizm Lens

Colours on the road and trail are rich and saturated, and there is plenty of contrast to play with to help your eyes pick out obstacles, hazards and imperfections quickly. I’d even go as far as saying the Snow Prizm lens is a better crossover between road and trail than the Road Prizm lens.

The aesthetic is likely to polarize riders, but for the fashionable roadies or enduro bros and bro-detts who aren’t big fans of googles, the Wind Jacket 2.0s are worth a look.

Cheap Oakley Aro3 MIPS helmet Sunglasses

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Oakley’s Aro3 quickly sorts us all into two camps: the camp that embraces new and out-of-the-ordinary aesthetics, and the camp that prefers traditional styles and shapes. While both tribes are likely to enjoy the exceptional fit, venting, and featheriness of the Aro3, only the stylistically adventurous will truly love this lid.

It’s got a bit of a hairnet-meets-90s-mushroom-helmet look and if we’re being honest, it shares a lot of style cues with POC’s Octal — yet it’s sleek and modern, too. That’s part form and part function: large front vents allow plenty of air movement over the head and out the back. The MIPS liner does cut down some of the venting, but there’s enough air moving over and through the helmet to keep it plenty cool. If you’re heading out for a long, hot climb, this is the cheap Oakley offering to reach for.

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Perhaps the best feature of the Aro3 is one that it shares with the Aro5: the Boa FS1-1 fit system. It adjusts quickly and easily via the rear Boa dial, so you can dial in your snugness in tiny increments. And the TX1 braided textile lace Oakley replica uses is so low-profile that it barely registers on your head. Oakley says it lays flat against the rider’s head, but it’s really so thin that it’s hard to tell if this is true or not. Or if it matters. Regardless, the FS1-1 fit system doesn’t interfere with your replica sunglasses at all, which is the most significant benefit.

Make no mistake, this is an excellent helmet. But it isn’t without its shortcomings. The straps are thin and comfortable against the skin, but the buckle doesn’t hold that thin strap in position strongly enough. That means the strap can loosen over time. The ear junctions are also not adjustable, which isn’t a problem if they line up where you like them. But if you’re a fidgeter, you might find yourself yearning for some sort of adjustment system here.

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The onus on Oakley outlet, upon entering a crowded helmet market, was not just to be good; it had to be among the best. The Aro3, and its more aerodynamic sibling the Aro5, both prove cheap Oakley has more than met that criteria. Smart touches like the integrated cheap sunglasses dock make it an easy helmet to reach for, and the venting makes it worthy of hot, long days in the mountains.

Adidas Evil Eye Evo L sunglasses review

To say that Adidas is a huge company is an understatement. The German company is the second largest sportswear manufacturer in the world, just behind Nike. Why is that important to cycling eyewear? It allows research and innovation from other sport markets and gives Adidas the capital to make some very impressive products, like the Evil Eye Evo replica sunglasses.

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The vision and clarity is impressive

Large size delivers protection and brilliant optics

First things first, the Evil Eye Evos in the large size are very big and feel protective when on. The lenses span a huge 144mm and the small version of the Evil Eyes still spread a rangy 134mm. For comparison, Oakley’s standard Jawbreaker measures 131mm and Smith’s Attack Max occupy 125mm.

That mega size is definitely interesting, with the feeling of safety reminding me of wearing goggles at first.

Despite the large dimensions, the frames stayed out of my field of vision both on the road and on the trails. It was only when torquing my eyes to some odd angle could I notice the frame, which isn’t at all common when riding.

I tested the Evil Eyes with LST polarized silver lenses and the details they brought out were incredible. In spite of the silver description, the lenses had more of rose-colored tint. In addition to intensifying most colors, the reddish hue also provided rocks, roots and other trail features with more depth and more contrast, and therefore made them easier to judge.

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The lenses are secure yet super easy to pop in and out

The Evil Eye lenses included Light Stabilizing Technology, which Adidas claims: “works like a color equalizer, enhancing the perception of pure primary colors.” That tech combined with the lenses’ polarization did offer impressive clarity in both sunny and shaded areas. The typical few moments of eye adjustment when diving into a tight wooded section from full sunlight was greatly reduced.

It didn’t take long before I forgot that the mega-size Evil Eyes were on. It was only when I took them off, then it was kind of a letdown. The letdown had nothing to do with the glasses, but rather that my natural, un-enhanced eyes weren’t that sharp and that colors weren’t as enchanting.

Prone to fogging and a snug fit

In contrast to our typical arid, almost desert-like climate, I rode with the Evil Eyes on numerous rainy, humid days. Both on road and on the trail, they had a tendency to fog up when climbing slowly and working hard. Like almost all glasses, that was amplified when coming to a stop and trying to compose my breathing.

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There are two vents over each lens to exhaust moisture and hot air

But on the flipside, once moving again the little vents at the top and bottom of the frame allowed enough air in to defog the lenses and restore clear vision.

The only other quibble I noticed was that the arms were tight above my ears. The fit, especially with the adjustable nose piece, was very secure however.

Adidas Evil Eye Evos L bottom line

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A hard case and microfiber lens cloth bag is included

These are unique sunglasses in that they provide a distinct visual boost combined with high levels of protection. If your riding takes you through overgrown, bushy trails or dirt and dust are common annoyances, the Evil Eyes provide a layer of protection that bridges the gap between regular replica sunglasses and full-on goggles.

Oakley’s smart Radar Pace sunnies with earphones in are your UV-defeating soundtrack to the Tour de France

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With the world’s greatest cycling competition/pharmaceutical experiment in full swing, high-end eyewear maker Oakley has released a limited-edition Tour de France version of its Radar Pace replica sunglasses to celebrate the history and legacy of the iconic competition.

Radar Pace, the firm’s smart sports sunglasses incorporate in-ear headphones for music and a real-time, voice-activated coaching system, which can be adjusted to help you train harder and for longer while out on two wheels.

The Tour de France edition includes an exclusive PRIZM Road Lens that’s been etched with the Tour de France logo and detailed with a unique iridium coating “inspired by the regions of France”.

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These highly technical, IPX5 water resistant glasses have a touch pad at the temples to control volume and take/end calls with a tap or swipe.

As well as your mobile, the system can pair to external sensors to track power output, heart rate, speed, cadence, distance, time and more.

Each pack includes two ear booms, a clear lens for low light conditions, a unique iridium PRIZM Road Lens, a case and Tour de France microbag, two replacement nose pads and – yes! – a micro USB cable.

The Oakley limited edition Tour De France Radar Pace replica sunglasses are available now with a price tag of £40.

Oakley Wind Jacket 2.0 replica sunglasses, with PRIZM lens

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Skiing in cheap sunglasses on a perfect spring/summer day is one of the best feelings ever… until your eyes begin watering like crazy and said sunglasses fly off your head into a snowy abyss. The answer: the Wind Jacket 2.0, a big-lensed, snug-fitting pair of shades with heaps of retro flair, to boot. These puppies come with a removable strap and PRIZM lenses that enhance color and contrast. I’ve been sporting these while skiing, hiking, biking, paragliding, rollerblading, river-rafting, boating, you name it. They’ve remained squarely in place through all of these activities, blocked wind and generally enhanced my experiences via the remarkable clarity and contrast offered by PRIZM.

More on the PRIZM front: These replica sunglasses are catchy, no doubt about it. Everywhere I roam folks inquire, “What are those?!” I often go so far as to take ’em off of my head and welcome strangers to try them out, and I explain the benefit and the magic of PRIZM. People dig the look, that’s obvious, and they’re almost always sold on these puppies when they see the world through the PRIZM lens. The next question they’ll ask is, “Hey, wait a minute, do you work for Oakley outlet?!” “No,” I reply. “I’m just that big of a m’f#ckin’ fan.”

Jacket up, folks.

Note: The Wind Jacket 2.0 comes in six colorways. I dig the Neon Retina frame with PRIZM Snow Black Iridium lens for its funky-fun look, but I feel compelled to say that the PRIZM Snow Torch Iridium lens that comes standard with the 80s Green and Neon Orange/Red frames is just the best; it brightens and warms up your experiences in a way that I guarantee you’ll appreciate. Catch a sneak peek at those colorways, below, and click on the nifty button here for all the deets.

Popular replica sunglasses store Oakley coming to Eastview Mall

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The popular eyewear and clothing company Oakley will open its first Rochester-area store this fall.

Victor, N.Y. (WHAM) – The popular eyewear and clothing company Oakley will open its first Rochester-area store this fall.

The Oakley outlet store will be located in Eastview Mall next to the Apple Store.

The 2,100-square-foot store will have replica sunglasses, sports visors, ski/snowboard goggles, watches and other accessories.

More store announcements are expected in the coming months, according to Eastview Mall developers.

Cheap Oakley Jawbreaker Prizm Road sunglasses review

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Cheap Oakley’s Jawbreaker Prizm Road sunglasses are, for the most part, an excellent pair of shades for road cycling. The optics are crystal clear with no distortion and the Prizm tint clarifies road surface as well as provide the basic UV protection and shade for your eyes. The adjustable fit is comfortable and, thanks to Oakley’s so-called Unobtainum rubber bits, quite sturdy.

Yes, the look is polarizing (forgive the pun), but I’ll focus here on what you see from the inside out, not how the glasses themselves look. That’s for you to judge.

The 53mm tall lens works well for riding in the drops. The extended upper piece lets you see up the road when your head is tilted down.

The 131mm width wraps around the face considerably, with scalloped lower sections making room for your cheekbones.

My own gripe with the construction design is how the Oakley logo protrudes on both sides into your peripheral vision.

There are tradeoffs regarding the merits of frameless replica sunglasses versus something like the Jawbreaker with a full frame. Frameless offers excellent, unobstructed vision, but, if you drop ’em, you scratch ’em. The Jawbreaker frame isn’t really visible (save those annoying logos), unless you’re really rolling your eyes, and it has saved me more than a few times when accidentally dropping the glasses.

The nosepiece is adjustable for width and the earpieces for length. Both feature a tacky rubber that replica Oakley, in true Oakley fashion, calls ‘Unobtanium’. Whatever the silly name, the stuff works quite well. When rattling across lousy road surfaces or even the cobbles of Paris-Roubaix, the fake sunglasses stay perfectly in place, no matter how much sweat is pouring off your face.

Speaking of pouring sweat, discount Oakley has an excellent water-deflecting treatment that it puts on the outside of the lenses. For my money, I’d like to see it on the inside, too, as sweat smears are annoying.

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The hydrophilic treatment on the lens works well — I just wish Oakley would add it to the inside, too

The vents on the lens do their job. I have yet to notice the lenses fogging up, despite slow, laborious climbing in a full range of temperatures.

Opening the Jawbreakers to change or clean the lens is a tidy mechanical process. You flip up the nosepiece on a pivot, slide open a little metal latch and the upper and lower frame pieces then pivot open like a jaw.

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Once the nosepiece cam is opened up, the entire lower frame pivots downward, releasing the lens

The channels that hold the lens have little rubber bumpers too for a quiet and secure fit.

The Jawbreakers aren’t the lightest things in the world, but at 34g they aren’t a nuisance on your face.

The Jawbreakers come in a variety of frame colors and special edition models.

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Instead of using snap-together plastic parts to secure the lens as with the Jawbone, the Jawbreaker uses a proper cam mechanism that’s partially made of metal and built into the nosepiece